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January 1862

Journal of Landsborough's Expedition from Carpentaria, in search of Burke & Wills
Melbourne, Wilson & Mackinnon & F F Bailliere, Publisher, 85 Collins-street east.
(Ferguson 11329).
1862.

Wednesday, 1 January 1862.
At 21 Outwards and 27 Inwards Camp we rested the horses, some of which were very sore-footed and tired. We also observed New Year's Day by dividing a bottle of rum, sundry pots of jam, and an extra allowance of meat amongst us. The waterhole was nearly dry.

Thursday, 2 January 1862 - Camp 27.
At 6 a.m. we left 27 Inward and 21 Outward Camp, situated both on the right bank of the creek; at 7.35 made two miles about east by north half north down the creek; at 7.53 made three-quarters of a mile north-east to Number 20 Camp; at 8.7 made half a mile east-north-east down the creek, where we left it to go on the tableland on its left bank; at 9.5 made two miles and three-quarters north to where we crossed a small creek, which is from the west; at 10.45 made four miles and a half due north, and there, having instructed Campbell and Allison to proceed to Clifton Creek and encamp, accompanied by Fisherman, I went two miles and a half west, and made our latitude by observation of the sun 19 degrees 31 minutes 35 seconds. Jemmy I had sent back for my rifle, which was left behind. At 12.45 started to camp; at 1.47 made two miles and a half east-north-east to Camp 18 Outward and 28 Inward on Clifton Creek.

Friday, 3 January 1862 - Camp 28.
From old stubs out of cast-off shoes Mr Allison shod a horse for Fisherman to accompany me to the O'Shanassy River. We started for it at 11.50. At 1.25 reached it, in about four miles and a half, at a point a short distance below, where we had been on it a few days ago. We found it had been flooded since we last visited it, and the holes along its bed were in consequence full of water. Judging from this that rain had fallen from the southward, I felt disposed to proceed in that direction, but considering the short time at my disposal and the condition of the horses and their want of shoes, and knowing that the time was fast approaching when the Victoria would, from want of provisions, be obliged to leave the Depôt at the Gulf of Carpentaria, I considered it expedient to continue my return journey.

Saturday, 4 January 1862 - Camp 28.
We left Inward Camp 28 and Outward Camp 18 at 9.2. This camp is situated on Clifton Creek; at 9.38 one mile and a quarter east down the creek to the broad arrow L tree; at 10 made three-quarters of a mile north to where we left the creek; at 10.20 made three-quarters of a mile east-south-east to rich tableland; at 10.38 made half a mile south-east by south to track where Mr Allison stayed behind to get the latitude; at 10.50 made three-quarters of a mile east; at 11.18 made three-quarters of a mile east to O'Shanassy River; at 11.52 made one mile and a half north-east by north to the junction of Clifton Creek, on which we had our last night's camp; at 12.16 made one mile north-east by north down the river; at 12.45 made one mile and a quarter east by north down the river; at 12.55 made half a mile east by north to junction of little creek from the south. Ridges on both sides, long straight race covered with blady grass, near deep reach of water, which has apparently a permanent stream; at 1.30 made half a mile east by north to where we crossed a small creek from the south; at 1.40 made half a mile east-north-east to where we crossed, near its junction with the O'Shanassy River, a watercourse from the south named by me the Douglas River; at 2.50 made one mile and a quarter north down the river to where we crossed a small creek from the south-east. The O'Shanassy has a good stream of water. On these ridges I observed marjoram. They are nearly barren and confine the river closely on both sides. At 3.15 made three-quarters of a mile north-east along a confined part of the river where it has very high flood-marks; at 3.40 made half a mile east-north-east to where we crossed a little creek from the south, near its junction. At 4.3 made quarter of a mile east down the river; at 4.15 made quarter of a mile east-south-east down the river; at 4.30 made quarter of a mile east up a gully from right side of the river; at 4.40 made quarter of a mile north-east down a gully to the river; at 4.50 made quarter of a mile east down the river to where we formed our 29th camp. Here we were joined by Mr Allison and Jemmy. The former, near where they left us, made the latitude 19 degrees 31 minutes 49 seconds, which is nearly the same as I made it a few miles to the westward.

Sunday, 5 January 1862 - Camp 29.
Started at 8 a.m. and went along the edge of the river which was very confined; so much so that the horses had at one place to be led. Accompanied by Fisherman I left the party and went a few hundred yards ahead to a creek full of water to widen with a pick a path up the creek. While I was doing so Mr Campbell reported that some of the horses had gone into the river of their own accord, and one of them was drowned although Jemmy and he had swum to its assistance. On hearing of this misfortune I came down to the river, got the two troopers to go and dive where the mare had disappeared, and they managed to get its saddle and pack on shore. Fisherman, while the things were being dried, marked the tree on the point at the junction of the watercourse with the river. The former I have named Harris Creek. At 11.56 started again at point where the tree is marked, say half a mile from camp; at 12.2 made half a mile south-south-east from river up the creek, where we crossed after a delay of eight minutes; at 12.33 made three-quarters of a mile north to where we crossed the river; at 1.2 made one mile north down the river; at 1.27 made three-quarters of a mile north-east by north to where we formed our Number 30 Camp, where the river is apparently often badly watered. At this part of the river even now it is without a running stream although recently flooded, and there is an absence of the pandanus, cabbage, and tall drooping tea-trees which crowded the bed of the river higher up and are fine signs of the permanence of the water.

Monday, 6 January 1862 - Camp 30.
Started from camp which is situated on left bank of O'Shanassy River at 6.52. At 7.8 made half a mile north-north-east down the left bank of the river; at 7.40 made one mile and a quarter north-east to where we crossed a creek near its junction, and also crossed to the right bank of the river; at 7.57 made half a mile north-east to where we recrossed to left bank of the river; at 8.15 made half a mile east-north-east to where we crossed a little creek near its junction. The river is still confined by barren and stony ranges and has flood-marks from thirty to forty feet high. Kangaroos are numerous on this part of the country. At 8.43 made three-quarters of a mile east to where we crossed, near its junction, a small creek from the north; at 9.12 made one mile and a quarter east by north to where there are flooded box and drooping tea-trees in the bed of the river; at 9.25 made half a mile east to where there are cabbage-trees in the river; at 9.40 made half a mile east to where there are Leichhardt and cabbage-palm-trees; at 10.5 made three-quarters of a mile north-east down the river (we have been following it when practicable on the left side) at 10.45 made one mile and a quarter east down the river where it is very confined and well watered; at 11.20 made half a mile east-north-east to opposite junction of river from south, where I, accompanied by Fisherman, left the party and crossed the river on a log to see it. We found it rather smaller than the O'Shanassy and I have named it the Thornton River. We marked a tree broad arrow before L on the point between the two rivers and started after the party at 12; at 12.25 made one mile north-north-east along the track down the river; at 12.43 made three-quarters of a mile east-north-east along track down the river; at 1.7 made one mile north to where we overtook Campbell and party, having dinner on the bed of the river. Started again after marking a tree broad arrow before L E, at 3.33; at 3.45 made half a mile north to where the confined bed of the river is at places boggy and on the edge of the waterhole the tea-trees are very tall; at 4.20 made three-quarters of a mile north-north-west and camped.

Tuesday, 7 January 1862 - Camp 31.
Camp 31 is situated on the left bank of the O'Shanassy River.
We started from there at 9.10; at 9.45 made a mile and a quarter north by east down the left bank of the O'Shanassy River; at 9.55 made a mile and a quarter north-north-west to opposite junction of a watercourse which I have named the Seymour River; at 10.12 made three-quarters of a mile north-west to where we crossed a small creek with reeds in its bed at a point near its junction with the river; at 10.37 made one mile north-west by north along the left bank of the river, where we had a good road. The river is still confined by ranges which sometimes terminate with cliffs; at 10.48 made half a mile north-east to opposite junction of the creek; at 10.54 made a quarter of a mile north-east to where we crossed a small creek near its junction with the river; at 11.27 made one mile and a quarter north by east along the left bank of the river; at 11.42 made half a mile north; at 12 made three-quarters of a mile north-north-east to where we watered the horses and waited for Mr Campbell. Started again at 12.30. At 12.53 made half a mile north-north-east. Made quarter mile north to where we waited to mount Mr Campbell who was tired of walking. Started again at 1.3 p.m.; at 1.35 made a mile and a quarter north to opposite junction of creek from the east; at 2 made one mile west-north-west to where we formed our 32nd camp, on the left bank of the river and right bank of a gully just above the junction of a small creek with the river. If this had been a good season a fine place for the horses would have been up this gully, as the soil is good with right kind of grasses and surrounded by basaltic cliffs.

Wednesday, 8 January 1862 - Camp 32.
Camp 32. Situated (as before) on the left bank of the O'Shanassy River.
Left here at 7.7; at 7.18 went half a mile north-north-west to a cleft hill on the left bank of the river; at 7.35 went three-quarters of a mile north; at 7.52 went half a mile north-east; at 8 went quarter of a mile east-north-east to where we got any quantity of figs from trees like the Moreton Bay fig but another variety. At 8.20 made half a mile north-east. This scrub is composed of Leichhardt, tea, fig, and cabbage-palm-trees, where we were delayed till 8.42 from having to pull one of the horses that had got into a boggy place out. Pandanus along the edge of the reaches of water. At 9.10 made half a mile north-north-east through the scrub; at 9.50 made one mile north by east through the scrub; at 10.5 made half a mile north-north-west which took us out of the scrub and to a fine reach of water; at 10.20 made half a mile north-north-east to where we crossed a small reedy creek near its junction with the river; at 10.35 made three-quarters of a mile north-north-east along the left side of the reach of water mentioned. I, accompanied by Fisherman, here made a deviation from the river. While Campbell and party proceeded down the river we went up a gully of the richest soil, but all the vegetation was withered from the dryness of the season. It, like the other gullies we saw afterwards, was surrounded by basaltic hills, which were again surrounded by basaltic columns composed of rocks of a more grotesque form than the columns which are common in a granite formation. The rocks were so rough that it was unpleasant to lean against them; and were very severe on the feet of the horses. These columns, with the bottle-trees in the foreground and the open flats and basaltic hills in the distance, had a picturesque appearance. When we had got three-quarters of a mile about north-west we started again to overtake our party. At 12.15 made one mile and a quarter north down a gully; at 12.23 made quarter of a mile north-east to where Fisherman and I thought we were on a flat of the Gregory River near its junction with the O'Shanassy; at 12.52 made one mile and a half east-north-east across the plains to the right of a range towards Smith's Range, on the right side of the O'Shanassy River and its junction with the Gregory River; at 1.9 made three-quarters of a mile north to the left bank of the O'Shanassy River, where we got the tracks of Campbell and party; at 1.45 made one mile and a half north-west to broad arrow before L marked tree, on the point formed by the junction of the Gregory with the O'Shanassy River, near which we found our party had formed their 33rd camp on the right bank of the Gregory River.

Thursday, 9 January 1862 - Camp 33.
Camp Number 33. Situated between the junction of the Gregory and the O'Shanassy River.
We left here at 8 a.m.; at 8.15 made half a mile south-east to where we crossed O'Shanassy River to follow down the Gregory River; at 8.37 made three-quarters of a mile north. Then from the right bank of the river we went round a hill which terminated abruptly at it; at 8.45 made quarter of a mile east-north-east over stony ridges covered with triodia; at 8.53 made a quarter of a mile north-north-west over similar country; at 9.9 made half a mile north-west to the river; at 9.37 made one mile and a quarter north-east by east to where we crossed a small creek near its junction with the river; at 9.55 made three-quarters of a mile north-east by east to where the river is confined on both sides by ridges; those on the right side are isolated; at 10.45 made two miles and a quarter east half north and delayed till 10.55; at 11.15 made three-quarters of a mile east to a hill which rises abruptly from right side of river; at 11.26 made quarter of a mile south-east back from the river; at 11.45 made three-quarters of a mile east-north-east to where we crossed a small creek near its junction to the right side of the river; at 12.10 made one mile north-east to a patch of good soil with good grass, but old and withered. At 1.5 made two miles and three-quarters over flats and ridges, the former of good soil but the grass burnt up from the dryness of the season, the latter stony and badly grassed, to a gap with an isolated hill on the north-west and two on the north-east side; at 1.22 made three-quarters of a mile north to where we delayed at the river to water the horses till 1.48; at 2.37 made two miles and a quarter east over fine rich country, the grass of which was just beginning to show life in consequence of recent rains; at 3 made one mile north-north-east to the right bank of the river where we intended to camp, but were obliged to go further as the horses could not water from the steepness of the banks. At 3.20 made one mile north-east and encamped where there is a rapid stream of water about two feet deep below the reach I have mentioned.

Friday, 10 January 1862 - Camp 34.
Camp Number 34, situated on the right bank near where there is a good crossing place.
Mr Allison at one o'clock this morning made an observation of Pollux from an artificial horizon, which made its altitude 85 degrees 36 minutes. At 8.45 made one mile east-north-east over poor stony ridges and light loamy flats, in which the tombung fruit-trees were plentiful, also the following trees: bauhinia, broad-leaved box, broad-leaved Moreton Bay ash, sweet-smelling jessamine, and bloodwood. The flats have got good grasses and marjoram. The river has here isolated hills on its banks, with ranges a mile or so back; at 8.55 made half a mile north-east by east to river about 150 yards wide with high flood-marks, which I have named the Ligar after the Surveyor-General of Victoria; at 9.6 made half a mile east-north-east down the Ligar River to where we crossed it above an isolated hill, where it was dry; at 9.30 made one mile north-east by east to bluff rocky hill where the flood-marks are about 30 feet high, west-north-west side; at 9.52 made one mile north-east along a range with a bluff termination; at 10.35 made two miles and a quarter east-north-east in sight of the high trees of the river; at 11 made one mile east-north-east to the mount, on the west side of which, at the Gregory River, we watered our horses and started again at 11.15; at 12.8 made two miles and a half north-east by east half east to west side of a range; at 12.35 made one mile and a half north-east to Heales Creek and gap in Primer Range; at 12.55 made three-quarters of a mile north-east down the creek to the last hill coming down and the first going up the river (I have named it Mount Heales after the premier of Victoria). It was about one mile to the eastward of our course; at 1.5 made half a mile north-north-east from left bank of Heales Creek; at 1.26 made three-quarters of a mile north to Gregory River; at 1.30 made a quarter of a mile north down the river and encamped.

Saturday, 11 January 1862 - Camp 35.
Camp Number 35, situated north-west half north from Mount Heales, on Premier Range, on the right bank of the Gregory.
We left here at 7.3 a.m. At 7.20 made three-quarters of a mile north, which course keeps the tall trees of the river in sight; at 7.30 made half a mile north; at 7.42 made half a mile north-east, which course still keeps the tall trees of the river in sight; at 7.48 made a quarter of a mile north-east by north to the edge of a rich plain of the Gregory River; at 8.4 made half a mile north along the west side of plain; at 8.30 made one mile and a quarter north by east; at 8.40 made a quarter of a mile north-north-east; at 9 made three-quarters of a mile north by east, still keeping in sight of the tall trees on the river; at 9.24 made one mile north by east; at 9.58 made one mile and a half north; at 10.15 made one mile north-east; at 10.27 made half a mile north-east by north; over rich country, now beautifully grassed, slightly timbered along the river and watercourses with bauhinia, broad-leaved stunted box, broad-leaved Moreton Bay ash, bloodwood, acacia (which gives a gum like gum arabic, and is plentiful near the Depôt) pomegranate, and other trees; at 11 made one mile and a half north-east to the river, where we stopped for Mr Allison to get an observation of the sun. A short distance to the eastward observed apparent altitude of sun, which made our latitude 18 degrees 34 minutes 30 seconds. Started again at 2 p.m. At 2.15 made half a mile north by east; at 3 made two miles north-east by north; at 3.30 made one mile and a half north by east; at 3.55 made one mile north-east by north half north; at 4.13 made one mile north; at 4.30 made half a mile north-north-east; at 5.2 made one mile north by east; at 6.2 made two miles and a half north-north-east. By these courses we cut off the bends of the river excepting towards the last when we got too far away from it and required to make for it again. The country we went over was from the greenness and length of the grass the finest-looking country we have seen on the expedition; but I think the Barkly tableland is superior to it from its having more salty herbage. The timber is of a similar description to that I have recently mentioned except that the box was stunted (narrow-leaved instead of broad). Having reached water in an eastern channel of the river we formed our thirty-sixth camp on the right bank of it.

Monday, 13 January 1862 - Camp 36.
Camp Number 36, situated on the right bank of the eastern channel of Beames Brook.
From here I sent Fisherman to the south-east in search of water in that direction; and after Mr Allison had made an observation of the sun, placing us in latitude 18 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds, got by observed altitude 86.45. I left my party in camp and accompanied by Jemmy went in the following directions: At 2.6 went one mile and a half north to where I shot an emu, and started again at 3.6; at 4.6 went three miles north over rich plains covered with most fattening grasses; at 4.42 went two miles north-west half north to east channel of watercourse; at 5.10 went three-quarters of a mile north half west along a deep reach; at 5.20 went half a mile north-north-west over the finest plain country; at 5.40 went half a mile north; at 6 went half a mile north-west; at 6.30 went about one mile and a quarter north; at 7.30 went about two miles and three-quarters north to where we encamped close to the right bank of watercourse.

Tuesday, 14 January 1862.
Continuation of excursion made by Jemmy and I down the watercourse from 36 Camp; at 6.50 made one mile and three-quarters about north to where we crossed an eastern channel of the main watercourse; at 7.5 made three-quarters of a mile about north-west; at 7.35 made one mile and a quarter west to a running stream in a watercourse with banks so low that a rise of a few feet would flood the adjoining plains; at 8.20 made two miles about north-north-east over rich thickly-grassed country intersected by several watercourses and swamps, where I felt convinced was a watercourse to the eastward of the Gregory River (I afterwards ascertained this to be so) which I then supposed to be Beames Brook, as I thought we were on Gregory River when I started and intended following it down on its right bank only to the crossing-place on our outward journey. We took no rations whatever with us and delayed to 8.35; at 8.55 made one mile south-east; at 9.23 made one mile and a quarter south-east by south over a rich, well-grassed, and slightly-timbered plain to the eastern channel of the watercourse, where we made our breakfast off figs and the young wood of the cabbage-tree: we found it rather a light one, as we had no supper on the previous night. Started again at 10.25; at 10.55 made one mile and a half south-south-east; at 11.20 made one mile south-south-east to where we crossed an eastern channel of the watercourse; at 11.35 made three-quarters of a mile south-south-east; at 11.45 made half mile south by east; at 12.5 made one mile south by east; at 12.15 made half a mile south by west; at 12.35 made one mile south half west to watercourse where it has deep reaches of water and banks about twenty-six feet high. I guessed the last entry of miles as my watch had run down. We had a bath and started at 1.22. At 2.10 made two miles and a quarter about south half east along the watercourse to an eastern channel where the horses got water and we delayed until 2.22; at 2.44 made one mile south-east by south half south over plains; at 3.15 made one mile and a half south over plains; at 3.32 made three-quarters of a mile south-south-east over plains; at 4.5 made one mile and a half south to emu tree, where we stayed to separate the best portions of the emu I had shot and take them to camp; at 5.10 made one mile and a half north to Number 36 Camp.

Wednesday, 15 January 1862 - Camp 36.
Camp 36, situated on the right bank of Beames Brook.
Fisherman informed me that he had gone on Monday a long half-day's journey without finding any watercourse except one trending to the north-west and which, from his description, I thought might join the one I had seen about six miles distant. The country he saw in the course of his ride was well-grassed, lightly timbered plains, the latter stretching to the north-east. By climbing a tree he observed a range to the south-east. We left our camp here at 7.25; at 8.48 made three miles and a half north by west, which took us down rich plains with the river trees in sight along our course; at 9.45 made two miles and three-quarters north; at 11.15 made four miles and a half north, which course took us out of sight of the trees on the river, over a similar country to that I have described where we stopped for Mr Allison to take an observation of the sun, and for Mr Campbell and Fisherman, who were behind, to come up. Observations: altitude 86.52, latitude 18 degrees 18 minutes; we started again at 12.34 p.m.; at 1.17 made two miles north-west to where we crossed to the left side of eastern channel; at 1.35 made one mile north-west to watercourse with fine stream of water; at 1.50 made three-quarters of a mile north, where we watered the horses, and started again at 4.25; at 4.33 made a quarter of a mile about north where Jemmy and I encamped last Monday night; at 4.5 made one mile north-north-east to where we crossed to left side of eastern watercourse; at 5.24 made one mile and a half north-north-east over a thickly-grassed slightly-wooded plain with flood-marks on it; at 6.2 made one mile and three-quarters north over a similar country, slightly timbered with flooded box; at 6.13 made half a mile north-north-west; at 6.35 made three-quarters of a mile north-west by north over similar country; then crossed during a thunderstorm to left side of eastern channel of watercourse; at 7.15 made one mile and a half west by north to the main channel of Beames Brook which has a fine stream of water only a few feet below the level plains on each side of it. The water was muddy from the recent shower and in consequence anything but pleasant. Mosquitoes were very numerous and allowed some of us but little sleep.

Thursday, 16 January 1862 - Camp 37.
Camp Number 37. Situated on the right bank of Beames Brook.
We left here at 7.16; at 8.30 made three-quarters of a mile north-east by north to where we crossed to right side of an eastern channel of a watercourse; at 10.5 made four miles and a half north-north-east over level rich country, slightly timbered with stunted box and a small tree like the Queensland sandalwood, called by Mr Walker the gutta-percha tree, and reached extensive plains; at 11.15 made three miles and a quarter north-north-east over fine rich plains with the tall trees of the banks of a watercourse in sight to the eastward: at 11.32 made three-quarters of a mile north-north-west where we stopped on the plain, and Mr Allison made the following observation of the sun: altitude 86.45, latitude 18 degrees 0 minutes 50 seconds; started again at 12.58; at 1.10 made one mile and a half north over fine slightly timbered downs, but from the want of rain the grass on them was rather brown, to where we crossed to the right bank of a watercourse (Barkly River) with high flood-marks, but at present without water; at 1.20 made half a mile north where we recrossed it; at 2.25 made three miles north to where we crossed again to left side without finding water; we passed at this place a number of blacks perched in the trees; at 3 made a quarter of a mile north to where we stopped as we could not proceed in consequence of a heavy thunderstorm and the bogginess of the ground; at 4.35 made quarter of a mile south, then three-quarters of a mile northerly to where we formed our thirty-eighth camp on the left of the main watercourse (Barkly River).

Friday, 17 January 1862 - Camp 38.
Camp Number 38. Situated on the left bank of Barkly River.
The morning was wet so I thought that after the rain of yesterday we could not proceed, but it cleared up between 8 and 9, and at 10.20 we were packed up and started; at 10.45 made one mile north by east to the tree marked Lieutenant Woods with line and broad arrow; at 12 made three miles west to Beames Brook over richly grassed plains slightly wooded with stunted box; at 1.30 made quarter mile south by east where we crossed Beames Brook. We found the crossing-place a bad one; when a few of the horses crossed it became so bad that we had to unpack and unsaddle several before we could get them onto the firm ground on the left side of the brook. This is the first stream of water we have crossed since we left the O'Shanassy River near its junction with the Gregory. Beames Brook therefore must connect the Gregory with the Albert River, which accounts for the great size of the latter. At 1.55 made one mile north by west; at 2.20 made three-quarters of a mile north-west to Nicholson River, which has got a broad sandy bed so full of tea-tree that we could not see its breadth at this place; at 2.35 made half a mile south-east by east; at 2.55 made three-quarters of a mile east back to Beames Brook and to our outward track; at 3.4 made half a mile north-east to tree broad arrow before L, where we had on outward journey dined off the young wood of a cabbage-tree. We also observed the tracks of an expedition party trending towards the Depôt; at 4.10 made three miles north-east down the brook and then down the plain; at 4.45 made one mile and a half east to outward track; at 4.50 made half a mile south-west to our outward Number 2 Camp (Post Office Lagoon) where we expected to have got letters but in this we were disappointed.

Sunday, 19 January 1862.
Yesterday we rested ourselves and our horses; at 6.20 a.m. my party left the Number 2 Camp of outward, and 39 of inward journey, situated at what I call the Post Office Lagoon, near a point on the left side of the Albert River, just above the Barkly and Beames Brook. I stayed behind, attended by Jemmy, until 7.30, and marked the camp tree as I had done at the other camp with my brand, the number of the camp, and the date; at 7.30 we made about half a mile in a north-north-east direction over rich undulating well-grassed country, slightly timbered with flooded box; at 7.45 made three-quarters of a mile north-east; at 8 made three-quarters of a mile north-east by north over similar country; at 8.18 made one mile north-north-east across similar country with portions of it without timber; at 8.37 made one mile north-east by north down well-grassed plains with the timbered country extending from the Albert River about a mile to the eastward of our track; at 8.46 made half a mile north-east; at 10.10 made four miles and a quarter north-east down well-grassed plains to where we stopped to rest the horses for ten minutes, as the ground was very soft from the recent rain; at 10.35 made three-quarters of a mile north-east by east to triangle made on the left bank of the Albert River by Lieutenant Woods; at 10.58 made one mile north-east by east to where we crossed Moore's Creek; at 11.10 made half a mile north-east by east; at 11.20 made half a mile east-south-east to Albert River Depôt.

(Signed) W. LANDSBOROUGH,
Commander of the Victoria and Queensland Land Expedition. 8th February 1862.

I hereby certify that this is a true and correct copy of Mr Landsborough's journal.
H.W.N. CAMPBELL,
Second in Command.

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